11 Learnings from 11 Vegetarian Years

In quarantine, days blend together and weeks seem to crawl and fly by at the same time. This is making it less surprising that a year ago, I was celebrating 10 years of being vegetarian and had big plans for a (catchier) blog post on it. In the way I’ve only heard grandparents say, I blinked, and now here we are a year later.

Before I start with what I’ve been sitting on for a year, I want you to know I’m not going to ask you to be a vegetarian. Breath out a sigh of relief. Everyone who is pretending they weren’t worried about that, you exhale too. If quarantine has taught us anything, it’s that shaming or “shoulding on yourself” isn’t an effective call to action or motivator.

We don’t need a few people to be hardcore vegetarians or vegans. What will have even more impact, is EVERYONE eating less meat. Not a few people doing it perfect, but everyone doing it a little bit better.

It is, however, a time where we have heightened awareness of how small actions we make have big ripples to our family, communities, and world. That little twinge of inspiration, responsibility, and empowerment that allowed you to make a mask or change your grocery store behavior, that’s what I hope you walk away with.

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May 17, 2019 Cheersing to my 10 year anniversary at Art-a-Whirl

Quarantine is also a time where you have nowhere to be so you can read this, and Netflix will still be waiting for you.

For the sake of this conversation, a few terms I’ll use as I’ve explored all of these “diets,” with pescetarian being what works best for me.

  • Vegetarian: Do not eat red meat, poultry, seafood, anything considered “meat.”
  • Pescetarian: Same as above but eats fish/seafood (salmon, tuna, shrimp) but likely still eats mainly vegetarian
  • Vegan: Does not eat any animal by-products. No meats mentioned above, dairy, eggs, gelatin, and sometimes honey.

In May of 2009, my high school Current Events class watched some footage on the meat industry (mainly fast food) and how the animals are treated. As a lifelong animal lover, I was horrified by what these animals were enduring so that I could have meat in my diet, mainly out of habit.

The treatment of animals, with the addition of the toll the meat industry takes on our environment, amplified by the fact that I didn’t really care about meat, began my first day of vegetarianism on May 17, 2009.

I think the only way this choice could have stuck this long was from it being unequivocally my own decision, and the same is true for you.

Whether this propels you into a meatless decade, or makes you think more about your next meal, I’ll be thrilled. Reason being, if I said the only solution was being vegan, the majority of people (likely including myself) would say, shoot looks like I won’t be part of the solution…

I also take this approach because I can tell you after 11 years of being vegetarian it isn’t always easy. Having a less diverse diet has led to some digestive issues, and has called for a lot of trial and error of what my body needs (a large part of why I was technically vegetarian for four years, and pescetarian for the last seven).

In my opinion, this is a matter of quantity over quality. That’s how eating less meat becomes a cultural norm; and calls for grocery stores, restaurants, and the marketplace adapt to different demands.

I know you’ve heard why this matters, so I’m going to cover that with a selfish lens (if selfish is motivating, embrace it) and how to do it.

Why eat less meat and what’s in it for you-

  1. Your Health & Wallet If you’ve grocery shopped, you won’t be surprised meat is an expensive habit. It saves money in the long run too, by being significantly better for your health. A meat free or less meat diet has been shown to lower cholesterol, blood pressure, body mass index, along with lower risk for diabetes, chronic diseases, and cancers.
  2. The Environment For every one pound of meat you purchase, it took 2,400 gallons of water to create it. As large of a problem as our climate crisis is, I like having a tangible way I know I am helping, while other changes may be harder to make.
  3. The Animals Simply put, any hormones or antibiotics intentionally put into livestock, or waste/bacteria they unintentionally ingest, goes into your food. As eating clean and clean products becomes more and more top of mind, looking at how clean the source of your food is is often overlooked.
  4. Other People Even outside of COVID-19, meat packing plants are dangerous for employees and take a large toll on the nearby communities. By knowing where your meat comes from, you’re investing in the well-being of the essential workers that make your meals possible, and how safe those meals are.

How to eat less meat, with more purpose-

1. Don’t recreate the wheel: Instead of viewing less meat as a change to everything you’ve been doing, look at is as making substitutions. Write down all of your favorite meals/recipes and look for swaps that could be made. My favorites-
  • Substitutes for ground beef: Limiting red meat in one’s diet is getting more and more popular, making Gardein’s beefless ground and their meatless meatballs a super easy and impactful swap. I also love impossible burgers and their italian sausage. I try to always order impossible burgers in restaurants so they continue to be carried!
  • Substitutes for chicken: Two options that aren’t super high in protein but are great for taste are using jackfruit (easiest place to get it is Trader Joe’s) which can easily mimic pulled chicken or pulled pork. One product I like are Morning Star’s buffalo “chicken” patties, though the protein count is a bit low.
  • The deal about tofu: Chances are you’ve made tofu without really knowing what was going on, or god forbid, tried it raw…try to suppress that memory and try this again. Tofu is the easiest protein to manipulate the flavor to match any recipe, and as a result is a grocery staple of mine. It’s also super affordable (usually a block will be $2 or less, which will be enough for at least 3 meals). Here’s a great recipe for how to PROPERLY make tofu!
  • The Minneapolis-based Herbivorous Butcher probably deserves its own blog post, but I’ll just leave you with the link for now. My favorites are the maple sausage, sriracha brats, korean ribs, and vegan cheese! Online deliveries are available anywhere in the US ūüėČ

2. Meatless Mondays: Start with one day, one meal. Meatless Mondays have become so popular, there’s no shortages of recipes out there. You might do meat-free dinners on Monday, then to all meals on Monday, etc. Many popular bloggers, like Half Baked Harvest, now have vegetarian sections to help you out. And of course, Pinterest won’t disappoint.
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3. Start with breakfast: This is the easiest meal to eliminate meat from. If you’ve gotten in the habit of bacon or sausage, Morning Star has my favorite veggie sausage. Make a veggie egg bake, oatmeal (even if you prefer savory), yogurt parfaits, etc. and you’ll grow to not even miss it.
IMG_5352 4. Build-your-own bars: “I want to eat less meat but I can’t get my partner/family on board!” I credit my mom for coming up with this as she shopped, prepped, and cooked for our family with one lone vegetarian. Instead of changing the plan for everyone or making me something completely different, I would add a different protein. You can leave all toppings off in the same way to give everyone a say. Think fajitas, tacos, lettuce wraps, pasta, stir fry, pizza, salads, burgers, etc.
D944A899-D906-4D2E-8414-937B597A2406 5. Up your veggie intake: Instead of thinking as meat or protein as the “point” of a meal, center it around your vegetables. Aim to have vegetables take up half of your plate, with grains being 1/4 and protein 1/4. Treating protein as a supporting actor rather than the lead makes it easier to substitute the protein source.
IMG_1126 6. Look to Thai, Indian, and other Asian recipes: It might make you feel less trendy, but this is nothing new. Many Asian cultures have long relied on vegetarian recipes for religious or economic reasons. This means finding meatless recipes you love or recreating favorites from restaurants is that much easier!IMG_4495 7. Serving sizes are not created equal: This is where eating less meat refers to more than frequency. This is where nutrient packed veggies, like green peas, spinach, and broccoli, and grains (shown below) can add up to stretch a main protein source through more meals.
protein-serving-sizes 8. High protein grains: Changing your protein source or decrease portion size can call extra attention to what’s on your plate and how it’s serving you. I also often hear people are worried about not being full if they have less meat. This tip will help, my go-to grains are quinoa, farro, and brown rice; but there are many other protein packed options. This means adding farro to salad, making soups with quinoa, using buckwheat noodles for pasta or pad thai, etc. A little bit goes a long way.
9. Soup!: Another shout out to Mama Reed for this one. My mom would make soup for the family, but would split a smaller batch off for me before adding their chicken in. This is also an easy way to make something that lasts throughout the week, so you don’t have to go back to the drawing board every day. There is also countless vegetarian soup recipes, and I promise you the best one ever is shown/linked belowIMG_4621 10. Create more filling snacks: Staying satisfied throughout the day releases the need for protein-heavy meals. My go-to especially now that I’m working from home is making a smoothie in my magic bullet with a cup of spinach, 5 frozen strawberries, a scoop of protein powder, and almond milk. So quick! Here’s my recipe for chia pudding (protein powder is option, I like the texture that creates; you could use a yogurt instead). Last but not least, these amazing energy balls that my coworker called bites of joy ūüôā
11. Embrace the challenge: Many of us have more time on our hands right now, and have saving money top of mind. Use this to your advantage by having fun trying new recipes, challenging yourself to stick to strict budgets while shopping, and embrace meal prep. While you might be thinking, wow Sarah really knows how to have a good time…I promise it is fun! Whip up a new recipe and meet friends for a picnic to see what they think. Here’s two veggie buffalo dips I trialed for the Superbowl a few years ago. Be patient and kind with yourself, progress is the goal- not perfection.
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Regardless of what you’re eating, I think the most important practice is expressing gratitude. Thanking any animals involved in making your meal possible, the farmers, any factory workers, store employees, so on and so forth. This practice becomes a lot easier and more meaningful when some of those steps are cut out, for example by shopping at a farmer’s market.

This is a practice I was challenged to face head on. When studying abroad in Rome, our Sustainable Foods professor (who is by no means vegetarian) said that in the States our meat looks like play-dough, there’s no connection to what you’re eating or what provided it. I had recently reintroduced seafood into my diet, and liked the anonymity and denial canned tuna offered. One of my first meals in Rome, I got a seafood pasta and it arrived with multiple creatures looking at me. I panicked. Over the semester, I learned to not hide from this but embrace it.

If I’m going to eat meat in any way, the least I owe these animals who gave everything to sustain me, is to give them my attention.

“We are the ones of whom it will be fairly asked, What did you do when you learned the truth about eating animals? … Whether we change our lives or do nothing, we have responded. To do nothing is to do something.‚ÄĚ Jonathan Safran Foer

Author of Eating Animals and We Are the Weather: Saving the Planet Begins at Breakfast

Sweet and Spicy Cauliflower Wings

One year ago, I was less than a month into my new job at Comcast, when it was time for an end of summer potluck/cook off. I rarely have the chance to compete in things that do not require hand-eye coordination or an understanding of basic organized sports.

After years of guessing my way through football and March madness brackets, here was a competition I actually had the skill set for. My confidence paid off, and I made the italian summer salad, Panzanella, and walked away with the appetizer trophy.

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So Long Summer Cook-Off 2017

This year, my confidence was a given. I had gotten used to seeing that beautiful trophy on my desk, and explaining to others how I became the proud owner. I knew I needed to enter the appetizer category again, so I could win and keep the travelling trophy.

I landed on cauliflower wings being my golden ticket. They’re a vegetarian, paleo, gluten free spin on a fall favorite (#trendy), and they would catch people’s eye. The more people who taste my dish, the more that can vote for me.¬†¬†IMG_1126

As you may know from this blog, my recipes are scrappy. The recipes are made up, the dishes often are as well, and game-time decisions are rooted in what I happen to have in the pantry.

With so much on the line, however, I was motivated to do multiple trial batches of cauliflower wings. Finding recipes from all different trusted sources, I looked for the commonalities and tested out the differences. I feel confident that this recipe is the best cauliflower wing recipe out there. There, I said it.

INGREDIENTS

  • 1-2 heads of cauliflower (I used 1.5 for the tray you see above)
  • 1 bag of Mill’s almond flour, I probably used 2 cups
  • 3-4 eggs
  • 2 tbsp old bay seasoning or paprika, garlic powder, and salt/pepper
  • 2 cups Frank’s buffalo sauce
  • 1/4 cup agave nectar
  • 2 tbsp sesame oil
  • 1/8 cup butter (optional)
  • Baking sheet with tin foil and olive oil/cooking spray

INSTRUCTIONS

  • Chop cauliflower into florets– think about what size you want the “wings” to be
  • Pour 2 cups almond flour into separate bowl and mix in seasoning
  • Beat eggs in a separate bowl (if you’re not sure how many wings you’ll be making you can start with less and repeat the almond flour and egg steps)
  • Set up baking sheet with tin foil and lightly cover it with olive oil or cooking spray. This is an important best practice to keep the “breading” on the cauliflower.
  • Preheat oven to 425 degrees.
  • Moving one piece at a time, dunk cauliflower floret in the egg and then roll in it the almond flour. Many other recipes said to put the almond flour in a bag and toss the florets in it until they are COVERED with flour. Absolutely not. Roll it lightly but cover most the surface.
  • Place on *lightly oiled* baking sheet, and repeat until full.
  • Bake at 425 for 25 minutes, then flip each piece *carefully to not remove breading* and bake for another 20 minutes. Another unique detail here vs. others is that I insist on not adding the sauce until all baking is complete.
  • While the wings are baking, mix your sweet and spicy buffalo sauce- Frank’s buffalo sauce (not the spicy buffalo, I made that mistake), agave nectar, and sesame oil. Add melted butter if a creamy texture is desired and there’s no dietary restrictions against it.
  • Once wings are finished baking, decide how much sauce you would like to have. For saucier texture and strong flavor, dunk each piece quickly in sauce and set back onto tray. For a more controlled approach, use a spoon to do a heavy drizzle over the wings.
  • Note: If you are not serving these on the same day as baking, i.e. potluck, do not apply sauce until time of serving and keep wings in Tupperwares, not refrigerated.

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And for all of you wondering, the buzz for the cauliflower wings was unprecedented. When it came time to collect votes, I anxiously awaited the results while trying to pretend I didn’t care at all; as if, perhaps, this was just an office potluck.

They announced the appetizer category was tied. Truly I was crushed. If assuming mine was one of the appetizers tied for first, how in the world did I tie? I wanted to win by a landslide. Unanimous. Maybe it’s good I’m not eligible for many competitions after all.

After wrangling a few more taste testers, the final results came in. The chef of the Reuben meatballs was the new proud owner of the appetizer trophy. I smiled and applauded, just as I learned from all the awards shows. It was confirmed later that I was the other dish originally tied.

Truthfully, it took hours, some would say days, to accept this loss. I cleaned and organized my desk with a more minimalist look and feel, and haven’t noticed the absence of the trophy.¬†As ridiculous as it sounds, I still would have rather gave my heart and soul into a silly competition and still not win, than be too cool or reserved to let myself get swept away at all. I counted my success in the number of requests for this recipe, and awarded myself an A+ for effort. Take this recipe and run with it, you’ve got nothing to lose.

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Butternut Squash Curried Soup

There comes a time for everyone to face their fears. Mine is cutting squash and getting things out of the sink drain/garbage disposal. Apparently I’m the only one who does the latter, because it’s obviously not a foolproof plan.

But people everywhere are somehow cutting butternut squash, and living to tell the tale with all ten fingers. It’s inspiring. I make spaghetti squash in a crock pot to avoid this, but¬†buying frozen butternut squash wasn’t cutting it.

So after the advice of many brave souls, I bought butternut squash (with no plan or recipe) and put it in the oven (whole) at 400 for 10 minutes before attempting any chopping. Magic.

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That brought me to this what-do-I-have-in-my-cabinet soup. It was completely random but filling and delicious. Hope you enjoy!

INGREDIENTS

-1 butternut squash, chopped
-1 sweet potato, chopped
-1 1/2- 2 cups of (cooked) quinoa, I used tricolor from Trader Joe’s. You’ll need just 1 cup uncooked
-4 cups vegetable stock
-1 can diced tomatoes
-1 tbsp curry paste
-1 can coconut milk
-5 shakes curry powder
-3 shakes cumin
-1 tsp ginger garlic paste
-1 tsp sesame oil

DIRECTIONS

1. Bake whole squash at 400 for 10 minutes to soften (option to do this with sweet potato as well)
2. Chop squash and sweet potato as shown above
3. Place veggies in soup pot and add broth. Cover and simmer for 15 minutes. Stir occasionally.
4. Make 1/2 to 1 cup (dry) quinoa in separate pot in the meantime
5. Add curry paste, tomatoes, coconut milk to soup pot and start to mash potatoes and squash. Simmer for 10 minutes.
6. Mash squash and sweet potatoes again to desired consistency, or remove from pot and blend if you want it super creamy. I prefer some texture.
7. Add curry powder, cumin, ginger garlic paste, and sesame oil.
8. Stir and serve!
Yields ~8 servings

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Superbowl Sunday Veg Buffalo Dip- 2 Ways!

I’ve been a vegetarian for almost 9 years, and people always ask me if there’s anything I miss. To their disappointment, I always say no, and that it’s such a habit, I forget it’s an option.

And then this time of year in the #BoldNorth rolls around. Minnesotans. love. buffalo. chicken. dip. It’s in every crockpot at the tailgates, holiday parties, and you best believe it will be at Superbowl Sunday. And I’m jealous.

So here we are, the first recipe is vegetarian buffalo dip for the guests that don’t want to be eating bird food. Focus on mentioning there’s cheese, keep quiet about the cauliflower.

Health nuts, keep scrolling for the vegan/paleo buffalo cauliflower hummus that is dairy free, gluten free, and still adored by regular food people like my coworkers.

VEGETARIAN BUFFALO DIP

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INGREDIENTS
1 head cauliflower, chopped into florets
1 tbsp olive oil
1/8 tsp salt
4 ounces cream cheese
1 cup plain greek yogurt
1/2 cup Frank’s buffalo sauce
1 tbsp ranch seasoning
3/4 cup shredded mozzarella cheese
Sliced green onion
Carrots, celery, and/or chips and crackers for serving

INSTRUCTIONS

  1. Preheat oven to 450 degrees F. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper.
  2. Toss cauliflower florets with olive oil, salt and pepper on baking sheet. Bake for 15-20 minutes, or until tender and slightly browned. When cauliflower is done, lower oven temperature to 350 degrees F.
  3. Add roasted cauliflower to food processor and pulse until finely diced. Add cream cheese, yogurt, hot sauce, ranch seasoning and 1/2 cup mozzarella to the food processor and pulse until smooth and creamy.
  4. Transfer cauliflower mixture to a baking dish. Top with remaining mozzarella and optional blue cheese. Bake for 25-30 minutes, or until mixture is heated through.
  5. Remove from oven and garnish with sliced green onion and serve with carrot and celery sticks and/or tortilla chips.

""VEGAN/ PALEO BUFFALO HUMMUS
ingredients
INGREDIENTS

1 head cauliflower, chopped into florets
Sea salt/ himalayan salt and cracked black pepper to season califlower

1/3 cup tahini
1/3 cup olive oil
1/2 cup Frank’s buffalo sauce
1/4 cup lemon juice
Sliced green onion (optional)
Carrots, celery, and/or chips and crackers for serving

INSTRUCTIONS

  1. Preheat oven to 450 degrees F. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper.
  2. Toss cauliflower florets with olive oil, salt and pepper on baking sheet. Bake for 20-25 minutes, or until tender and slightly browned.
  3. Add tahini, olive oil, cauliflower, buffalo sauce, and lemon juice to food processor (blender in my case) and pulse until smooth and creamy
  4. Mix in sliced green onion if you’d like
  5. Transfer cauliflower mixture to serving dish. Sprinkle cayenne pepper on top. Cool and enjoy!

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Perfect for our arctic Minnesotan Sundays!

Nigerian Cuisine and Why I’m Grateful for Foodie Friends

 

“Are you cooking?!” My manager interjected with concern and horror all over his face. So much faith in me.

I confirmed I absolutely was, and continued to explain that this group of adventurous friends has shaped me, and pushes me to continue growing. I’m grateful and excited to try something new with them again tonight. I also asked everyone to cross their fingers it all turns out.

This crew, or my Romies as we like to say, gets together about once a month and recently we transitioned that into a cultural dinner party. Because that’s how all 20-something’s have fun.

Emily kicked us off by teaching us how to make sushi (because she loves to make and eat sushi) and we rebranded that evening into a getting a taste of her Japanese roots. Clearly, we had to run with this.

Tamara followed, with Serbian delicacies often reserved for Christmas, which happened to be completely vegetarian. Their willingness to cater to my pescetarian diet is probably why we’re such great friends.

 

That meal included a cheese pie topped with greek yogurt and apple sauce, a chickpea and bean dish, and dessert of baklava and honey pie. All of these dishes had real Serbian names but due to our Italian tradition of drinking lots of vino, I don’t remember what they’re called.

Next, it was my time to shine. Allison is on deck with an Armenian dinner, so I was kind of dreading coming up with a vegetarian English/German menu, which is basically an oxymoron.

And then it occurred to me, my cultural dinner could be inspired by the roots my family has chosen- African. Advice from my dad and some in-depth googling brought me to our Nigerian menu.

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Peanut Soup

My loose interpretation of the recipe above included:

  • 1 tsp peanut oil
  • 1 onion diced
  • 2 garlic cloves
  • 2 tsp ginger
  • 1 ¬Ĺ lbs sweet potatoes¬†chopped
  • 6 cups vegetable broth
  • 1 can diced tomatoes, un-drained
  • 1/2- 3/4 cup chunky peanut butter
  • 1 Tbsp tomato paste
  • ¬ľ -¬Ĺ tsp cayenne (I personally did probably 6 shakes of this)
  • 1 package chopped frozen spinach (defrosted and cooked)
  • ¬Ĺ-1 tsp salt

In a 4 quart soup pot, heat the peanut oil. Add the onion, garlic, ginger, and diced sweet potatoes. Sauté over medium heat until soft, 5-7 min.

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Greetings from my sous chef!

Add the broth, tomatoes with juice, peanut butter, tomato paste, and cayenne. Stir to combine and bring the mixture to a simmer.

Simmer the soup, covered, over medium-low heat for 10 min. Using a potato masher, roughly mash the soup to break up the potatoes. (You are still looking to have some chunks, so a coarse mash is all you need.) Add the greens and simmer uncovered for 5 min.

Jollof Rice, a recipe I actually followed for once! I added chopped sauteed shrimp.

Tamara brought something similar to samoas from the always wonderful Minneapolis-based Afro Deli. Allison nailed her dessert responsibilities with this banana cake that I’m still dreaming of:

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And those cute African placemats? Those would be courtesy of my adventurous grandparents. It’s amazing to think that such a special Friday night in my Minneapolis home was inspired, created, and built by a couple, grandparents, and a single woman immigrating from Serbia, Armenia, and Japan; and a family in Wisconsin deciding to moving to Africa with their dogs could be exciting.

It’s creating traditions like these that keep those stories part of us, and remind us how much we have to be grateful for.

 

Sweet Potatoes + Savory Oats

Like any normal person, I decided to make my grocery list by thinking of foods I liked the least. Sweet potatoes and oatmeal, welcome to the party.

I was never into sweet potatoes because the idea of potatoes being sweet was confusing, and brown sugar glazes or marshmallows made the situation even worse. Oatmeal felt like something that was designed to be healthy, but is always served with 30 grams of sugar. Add in my love for protein in the morning and I just didn’t see the point.

However, I thought I must be missing something, especially since¬†both dishes seemed like a very cost effective and filling addition to the day. Here’s how we all found love in a hopeless place:

Baked for Breakfast-¬†Put sweet potatoes in the oven at 425 for 45-60 minutes or until soft to the touch. Cut in half and add protein, hot sauce (if you’re me), and anything else you’d like. Any more potato than that and the ratio isn’t the best for us non-potato enthusiasts. You also just started the meal prep for multiple breakfasts, killin’ it.

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The yolk makes this amazing, topped with sour cream (or greek yogurt)

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Greek yogurt, cinnamon, honey, pecans, and apple pie jam

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Paired with Herbivorous Butcher’s maple breakfast sausage

Savory and Steel Cut- Every morning, my dad makes “oaties” on the stove for himself and our dog. That’s correct. It always seemed like an oddly long process, but yielding 4-5 servings made it worth it. Bring¬† 3 cups water with 1 cup almond milk to a boil, and stir in 1 cup steel cut oats. Simmer for 20ish minutes on medium-low, stirring regularly, until the mixture becomes thick.

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Oats with sauteed mushrooms, onions, and red thai sauce

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Mixed with chocolate chips, coconut, maple syrup, and raspberries for dessert

Let me know what you try!

Chia Pudding- Protein + Coffee

In my book, Sundays were designed for those if only I had time for… wish list items. For me this often means making up new and extensive recipes. However, if the Sunday somehow slipped away, this chia pudding recipe is a quick way to snack plan and make the rest of your week a breeze.
chia puddingWhat you need:

  • Protein Powder: Vanilla SFH Pure if you want to get like me, or¬†any will do
  • 8 tbsp chia seeds
  • 1 tbsp unsweetened cocoa powder
  • 3/4 cup coffee (let it cool)
  • 1-1.5 cup almond milk (I prefer original over¬†unsweetened)

Hit it:

Mix dry ingredients together, mason jars work amazing for this exact step. Then add in 3/4 cup chilled coffee, stir or shake. Fill the remainder of the jar with the 1-1.5 cup almond milk and stir or shake once again. Be sure that there isn’t any chia seeds or powder chunks sticking to the side.

Leave in the fridge overnight and then celebrate come snack time Monday morning! This amount is good for 2-4 servings, depending on how excited you are about chia pudding. So while you’re at it, make enough for the whole week.

Why I love it:

  • Get a mix of sweet and bitter with the vanilla, cocoa, and almond milk paired with coffee and chia seeds. Tasty enough for dessert but healthy enough for a daily snack. Win-win.
  • Chia seeds are rich in fiber, omega-3 fats (hard to get outside of fish and nuts), protein, and vitamins. Yes. Please.
  • It truly is as easy as it sounds to make, and is healthy snack to grab and go. Granola bars and flavored¬†yogurt, we’re onto you.

Enjoy!

Zoodle + Shrimp Pad Thai

Yes, please. If you haven’t heard me talk about my zoodler, you aren’t asking the right questions. I am obsessed.¬†If you aren’t familiar, I’m referring to a handy tool that can make noodles out of any vegetable. {Zucchini noodles–> zoodles –> zoodler} Technically it’s called a veggetti…but that name has obvious issues that the entire marketing team somehow overlooked. If you want to convince anyone that your dish is better than regular¬†noodles, I recommend staying away from that word.

Let’s hit it:IMG_4491

What you need (Prep 20 mins)
-First and foremost, a Zoodler! Aka a vegetti…but that name has obvious issues that the
entire marketing team somehow overlooked. So I call it a zoodler. Rice noodles could be used if you aren’t convinced this tool will change your life.
-6 zucchinis (on the smaller side)
-3 eggs
-15 shrimp, defrosted
-1 can chickpeas
-3 tbsp garlic
-Simmer sauce (Trader Joe’s Red Thai Curry is my fave)
-Crushed red pepper
-Lemon & pepper seasoning

IMG_4492How to (Cook time 15 mins)
-Start boiling the water and zoodle all zucchinis into a large bowl, set aside.
-Sautee shrimp and season with lemon & pepper spice, set aside.
-Add zoodles to boiling water, cook for 5-7 minutes; drain
-Chop shrimp into thirds, add to zoodles with drained chickpeas, garlic, and stir in simmer sauce to cover mixture. Low heat for 5 minutes.
-Scramble the 3 eggs, and stir in.
-Add crushed red pepper to taste, and serve!

Serves four. Or in my language, bring to work in a large tupperware and have with salad for four days ūüôā Why Zoodle?

  • Zucchinis are rich in fiber, protein, vitamins (A, B6, C & K), potassium, magnesium, and folate. This is true for zucchini squash as well!
  • Sweet potatoes are an amazing source of vitamin A (shout out to that beta-carotene), vitamin C, copper, magnesium, fiber, vitamins B1 & B2, and phosphorus. And then you get to say sweet patoodle. My kind of perk.

Compared to pasta, which usually has at least 200 carb-dense calories/serving. For me, the main differentiator is that vegetable noodles have one nutrient-rich ingredient going into their production, while pasta is processed and preserved.

I can tell you from my four months of living in Italy that all of those ingredients, preservatives, and coloring agents do make a difference. Fresh and homemade pasta was not reserved for the most gourmet restaurants, it is just how Italians make pasta. As a result, Americans who are gluten-intolerant/sensitive tend to not experience issues.

If a trip isn’t in the near future, start experimenting with fresh zucchini noodles!¬†Have a favorite zoodler¬†recipe? Please share!

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Thanksgiving Gamechangers

TurkeyDinnerRollsLargeThanksgiving is an interesting day for a vegetarian. Yes, the option of having a “bread turkey” has been visited, but I have never been one to get on board for swapping protein for carbs. I’ve had black bean burgers on my plate for many years, and frankly, it’s a little sad. I have friends that opt out and go for Noodles mac&cheese, but to my last points, I am determined this year to¬†be more included in my favorite¬†holiday.

This year, whole foods it is. Regardless of a specialized diet, it’s great to have options that you will be happy with during the feast that won’t leave you in a food coma. I promise these recipes are tried and true, even by coworkers terrified of kale. Let’s get cooking:

Autumn Salad

-2 cucumbersIMG_3690
-2 honeycrisp apples
-2 cups steamed/sauteed kale (optional)
-1/4 french baguette*
-1/2 chopped red onion
-3/4 cup dried cranberries (note: not craisins but just a health preference)
-3/4 cup chopped walnuts
-cover in balsamic vinegar** and olive oil
*If celiac sensitive: swap for quinoa, or leave out.
**Little known fact that I love to share: balsamic vinegar is amazing to pair with anything starchy (bring some for those mashed potatoes!) because it slows the spike in your blood sugar that comes from digesting carbs. On Thanksgiving, my blood sugar will take any help it can get.

The BEST Apple Butternut Squash Soup
(this is actually a Martha Stewart recipe, not a Sarah Reed original but I make it a lot so that counts for something, yes?)

I swap the chicken stock for vegetable broth and butter for coconut oil- highly recommend!

Balsamic Eggplant & Tofu
This is like my version of meat and potatoes, the end result is just about as colorful but don’t be fooled, this is filling and nutrient packed.

thanksgiving2 eggplants
1 package of extra firm tofu (TJ’s has my favorite)
Coconut oil
At least 2 cups balsamic vinegar
Cayenne pepper, sesame seeds, other seasoning as desired
1-2 handfuls raw almonds

Dice eggplant and place large pot with simmered 2 tbsp coconut oil. Pour 3/4 cup water over eggplant and cover
Stir occasionally, around 15 minutes until eggplant will be soft. Drain excess water and pour enough balsamic vinegar to cover top layer, cover again. Cook for 5 more minutes, or until balsamic is absorbed. Add sesame seeds & serve. (4 servings)

Slice tofu into diced quadrants, and soak in bowl of balsamic vinegar for 10 minutes. Add tofu to simmered coconut oil in sauce pan, flip tofu slices once golden brown (about 10 minutes). Expedited route: add balsamic vinegar to tofu after flipping, instead of marinating. Add in almonds while the second side browns, or add at end. (2-4 servings)

ENJOY and as always, let me know what you try!